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September 22, 2013
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Berry Punch 3D Render by Clawed-Nyasu Berry Punch 3D Render by Clawed-Nyasu
ALRIGHT. LET ME TALK TO YOU ABOUT THIS MODEL.

For starters there were about five moments throughout the course of it that I thought I was done, but I really wasn't because I'd be taking a render and then realize "aw damn it I forgot _____." Tons of small details that were way harder than I thought they would be made for the slowest workflow ever. That's not even counting the fact that I omitted a lot of details!

This wouldn't have been so bad if it hadn't kept crashing the program all the time. *_* I honestly can't even count how many times the program crashed while I was working on this. Often times during saving, thereby resulting in piles of corrupted files. Even with frequent iterative saving and Autodesk's autobackup feature, the amount of progress I lost on this was insane. Probably the worst one was before Bronycon, in which I lost all my work on the sandals and toga, which completely destroyed my motivation to work on it again. OKAY COMPUTER I GET IT I NEED MORE RAM, GEEZ.

That's not counting the fact that it was just generally hard. The hair took forever because it was really hard to get it to look right from all angles. The arm looked like it was at the same angle at the reference image, until the hair and goblet were added and I realized it was way too far back, except moving it forward kept putting it into all sorts of physically impossible positions and I couldn't figure out how to position the goblet in a way that it wasn't cutting into the wrist.

I'd rather make three Discords than work on something this hard again. Chrysalis is gonna be cake compared to this.

BUT DAMN IF SHE ISN'T IMPRESSIVE IN THE END.
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:iconleoparduspardali:
LeopardusPardali Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Student General Artist
She turned out just fine.
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:iconmtmipower:
MTMiPower Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2013  Hobbyist Filmographer
awesome dude!
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:iconlavenderextract:
LavenderExtract Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I think all of BerryTube will want this.  All of us!
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:iconsgtkururu:
Sgtkururu Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2013
Agreed! O.O
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:iconharikon:
Harikon Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist

lol don't you just hate how the 2d artist only have to worry about one angle, while the 3D artist has to worry about 360 angles. :)

 

 

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:iconhere-for-the-ponies:
Here-for-the-ponies Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2013  Student Digital Artist
If a render is done well, it'll look good from every angle. When a 2D artist can draw well, they'll be able to both design something that looks good and correct from every angle AND be able to figure out how to draw it accurately consistently.
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:iconharikon:
Harikon Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist

Oh don't get me wrong, I am not trying to put down any 2D or 3D artist.

it's just that the 3D balance game can be very frustrating sometimes, since it seems to be always one little thing that throws the whole look off.

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:iconhere-for-the-ponies:
Here-for-the-ponies Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2013  Student Digital Artist
If shading and lighting in a drawing isn't done realistically (or at all), then yeah, it would be a heck of a lot easier to render in 2D than in 3D, but if lighting is done to give 3 dimensionality to the drawing you really do need the same understanding of constructing 3D anatomy in both 2D and 3D media, and you also have to understand how to render lighting in 2D to give the illusion of depth and form of 3 dimensions. Both are pretty difficult, and I go to a school where both are taught and students can sometimes do 1 just fine and can't do the other to save their life. I've dabbled in blender a few times and I've dabbled in photoshop a few times and both frustrate me because of a lack of understanding of the program itself more than the lack of ability. Tradition art can be a heck of a lot easier in that sense for me at least.

TL;DR: I've tried out both and the programs are the toughest to figure out for me. I like to ramble about art because I love art :P Apologies for the word wall.
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:iconharikon:
Harikon Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist

Yeah I understand the issue with lighting, also now see why some artist use several different programs.

No one program can do it all, I see that now with ZBrush and how it is limited on rendering and lighting.

Also since I am self taught on a lot of the software, I lack a solid foundation for artistic insight on how things should look.

Of course trying to figure things out is part of the fun. :)

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:iconhere-for-the-ponies:
Here-for-the-ponies Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Everything in my gallery was before I started my attendance at this school, so up to now, everything in my gallery is the product of what I've learned on my own. The only thing submitted here that I worked on after I started my year at this art school I go to are some traditional ponies, which didn't really use anything I've learned so far because what I've learned in there just doesn't quite apply.

Being self taught works for some people, but there are other who don't realize they do certain things incorrectly and it can hurt in the long run for some artists. I'm not sure if I can learn the more complicated programs on my own. Most tools and settings just don't make observable differences that I can measure, and I just have a hard time telling what many things do without hearing something about them  from someone else.

It is very rewarding to take full credit on understanding and figuring out things, though. 
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